BREATHE!

from Creative Commons

 

We all do it. We rarely think about it. Most of us do it pretty much the same. There are

differences though – through the nose, through the mouth, quietly, noisily, using the

chest, using the abdominals, fast, slow, deep, shallow. Nurses and doctors listen to your

chest to hear the sound of your breath in your lungs. There are a lot of different sounds

there; crackles, wheezes, sometimes it even sounds like a washing machine, and

sometimes there isn’t much sound or even none at all.  Are you doing it right? Are you

getting the most bang for your buck from your breathing?

chest to hear the sound of your breath in your lungs. There are a lot of different sounds

there; crackles, wheezes, sometimes it even sounds like a washing machine, and

sometimes there isn’t much sound or even none at all.  Are you doing it right? Are you

getting the most bang for your buck from your breathing?

there; crackles, wheezes, sometimes it even sounds like a washing machine, and

sometimes there isn’t much sound or even none at all.  Are you doing it right? Are you

getting the most bang for your buck from your breathing?

sometimes there isn’t much sound or even none at all.  Are you doing it right? Are you

getting the most bang for your buck from your breathing?

 

Teaching us to breathe is a waste of time:

we all do it all the time.

 

But, is it really a waste of time? What happens to you if you don’t breathe properly?

Why is breathing important? We need to get oxygen into our bodies and carbon dioxide

out of our bodies to keep us alive. Our cells need oxygen.

 

How to Breathe Properly

The above link has some interesting information.

Below are the differences between proper and improper breathing

Proper vs. Improper Breathing

Proper Breathing

Effects pretty much every part of the

body. It oxygenates the body, revitalizing

organs, cells, and tissues.

Improper Breathing

Can cause problems for many systems in

the body, including the immune,

circulatory, endocrine, and nervous

systems.

Fuels energy production Mental fog
Improves focus and concentration Dizziness
Eliminates toxins Numbness
Strengthens the immune system Anxiety
Improves bowel function Chest pain
Reduces stress, tension, and anxiety Digestive problems
Increases feelings of calmness and

relaxation

Irritable bowel
Can lower blood pressure Neck and shoulder pain
Increases metabolism, aiding in digestion

and weight loss

(Karen Lee Richards. http://www.healthcentral.com/chronic-pain/coping-162182-5.html)

 

Courtesy of Curtis Wallace

 

I regularly use breathing to give me a boost when I am starting to droop in the afternoon

or early evening. At other times, I use breathing to relax and lower my heart rate. I also

encourage my life-coaching clients to breathe properly. Breathing deeply so that your

abdomen expands is one good way to ensure you are getting oxygen to the lower lobes of

your lungs; they are sometimes a bit short-changed. Give some different breathing

techniques a try.

 

Click on the link below and try the breathing exercises.

Three Breathing Exercises from Dr. Weil

 

from Creative Commons

 

 

 

 

 

I’m so busy, I hardly have time to breathe!

20160929_110903-2

 

Does this sound familiar?

Joe: “How are you?”

Busy as usual, not even time to take a breath.  How about you?” Jane says with pride.

“The same” Joe proudly responds.

Why are they both proud of this?  What has happened to bragging about the time you have for family, fun, golf, travel, or just plain reading?

Are you rushing from one activity, one task, to another?  How much do you have on your plate?  With all the things you are doing, do you see what is happening around you?  What about those changes you have been trying to implement at work; are they actually taking place, but you just haven’t noticed, or have they been totally ignored & you haven’t followed up?  What is happening with your spouse, partner, children – do you really know?  Of course you know, all activities are on the big home calendar that everyone uses so the family knows who is where & what each member is doing.

My husband & I have lived very busy lives for many, many years.  He continues to have a very busy life; but, due to health issues I have been forced to slow down.  When this first happened I was upset that I could not carry on with all that I was doing.  Friends said to me, “there’s always something good in everything; so there must be something positive for you in this”.  I agreed, but to be honest, it took quite a while before I found that being forced to slow down was actually a blessing.  As I slowed down I started to feel better physically & enjoy life again.  Now l just need to convince my impatient, curious self that I cannot say “yes” to everything I am interested in or want to do (I am learning, but am a bit slow at times).  I am learning I have to make choices & set priorities.  If I don’t take care of myself – physically, mentally, emotionally, & spiritually – someone else is apt to have to make those choices for me & set my priorities.  I don’t like being told what to do, so I must listen to my body (husband, friends, & physicians) & do what is best for me.  Doing what is healthy for me has actually allowed me to do many things I have been wanting to do for years – like writing a blog, offering life coaching, & writing a book.  And, I am finding time for my spiritual, mental, & emotional health in addition to my physical health.

What are you missing with your busyness?

  • Are you running the kids from one activity to another, but not having time to stay & watch them – unless you have your laptop with you so you can work?
  • Are you running from one activity to another but not really enjoying the activities?
  • Do you peak in on your staff & because no one tells you about a problem, you dash on to your next activity?

My husband is a diver.  He has often commented to me how many divers stop briefly, see a fish or two & then swim off to see what else is lurking beneath the waves.  He hangs out a bit longer, hovering silently in one spot & sees more fish & other underwater creatures that come to him, that come out of hiding when all is still.  What if we did that in our day-to-day lives?  Can you be still & silent for a minute.  Give it a try.  How hard was it?  If we can do this for a little longer what might we see & learn?

 

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I am doing my best to share what I have learned & experienced to promote self-care; especially self-care of my nursing colleagues through my blog, web-site, life coaching, & HeartMath®.  I have seen that what we are taught in nursing, about wellness being made up of physical, mental, emotional, & spiritual health is true. And, while we remember to take care of our physical health we forget the rest.  When did you last do something for your mental, emotional, or spiritual health?  What is that little inner voice of yours saying?  Are you sleeping well? Do you have too much stress and/or worry in your life.  Where do you get support?  Do you go to church, meditate, pray, or take time to reflect on your day, your life, or those things for which you are grateful?  Do you just sit outside & enjoy the beauty of our world? I challenge you to take just five minutes each day for one week, to sit outside still & silent; then reflect on what you saw, heard, & what you feel (maybe even write down your reflections).

I would love if you would share your experiences so we can maybe learn from each other.